July 5, 2015

It's Vacation Time

Be observant and helpful by watching over neighbors' homes, especially when you know they are not home or they have let you know they going to be out of town. They will likely return the favor.

Call 9-1-1 to report all suspicious or criminal activity! Anything that seems slightly "out of place" or is happening at an unusual time of day might be criminal activity. Don't worry that you're bothering the police or about being embarrassed if your suspicions prove to be unfounded. Think about what might happen if you don't act.

Going Away on Vacation?

  • Double check that doors and windows are securely locked.
  • Let neighbors know you're going on vacation and when you will return. They can keep an eye out for anything suspicious. If you don't know your neighbors, you can have a trusted friend drop by occasionally to do the same thing. If a friend is dropping by you can give your neighbors a description of your friend and their vehicle to reduce false alarms.
  • Make sure your home is well-lit so there are no hiding places.
  • Use random timers to turn lights on and off to make it look like you're home.
  • Install motion-sensing lights that turn on automatically when someone approaches.
  • Don't leave spare keys on your property. Burglars know all the places you might think of.
  • Put a hold on newspaper delivery until you return, and put a hold on your mail, too, so it doesn't pile up. Burglars look for such things as a sure sign someone is away from home.
  • Look at your house from the street and make sure no valuables are in sight.
  • Unplug your automatic garage door opener.
  • Don't talk on social media about your trip before you return home.
  • Remember to adjust your central air thermostat to an away setting. Also turn off tankless hot water heaters. A leaking hot water pipe will fill your home with steam and ruin more than just the floors. Yes, not crime tips, but easy to forget.

Summer Food Safety


Outdoor gatherings in summer months have added challenges to keeping food safe. High outdoor temperatures make it harder to prevent food-borne illness.
  • Devise and use a way to wash hands. Wipes are good, but soap, water, and clean toweling are better.
  • Keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. Don't set cold foods out in direct sunlight. Keep grilled food warm by placing it to the side of the grill until serving.
  • Food should not be left out for long periods of time. Use covers to prevent insects from getting on food. To avoid having too many leftovers sitting out, cook items such as hot dogs, brats, chicken, and other grilled foods in batches.
  • Be sure to keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood separated from prepared and cooked foods. Most importantly keep it separate from fruits and vegetables that are going to be served raw.

July 4, 2015

About Calling 9-1-1

Call 9-1-1 as soon as you are able about all suspicious or criminal activity! Anything that seems slightly "out of place" or is happening at an unusual time could be criminal activity. Don't worry that you're bothering the police or about being embarrassed if your suspicions prove to be unfounded. Think about what might happen if you don't act.

Never place yourself in harm's way trying to get details about suspicious or criminal activity that you observe. Details can help police a lot, but it's very important that if you need to get to a safe place, you do that before you call.

If you're driving when you observe suspicious or criminal activity find a safe place to pull over and park to make your 9-1-1 call. Your call may be garbled or even disconnect if you're moving AND it's safer if you don't talk while driving.

When contacting 9-1-1 it's important for you to be able to articulate:

  • Your location and phone number if calling from a cell/mobile phone.
  • Who you observed (a description).
  • What did you see? Be specific.
  • Where was it?
  • When did you see it?
  • Why in your opinion was it suspicious? Remember, you are more aware of what's normal for our neighborhood than anyone else, but you need to be able to communicate that.

To describe a person, provide information on as many of the following as possible:

  • Race, sex, and age.
  • Height, weight, and hair color.
  • Peculiarities like scars, tattoos, missing limbs - any noticeable features.
  • Weapons, if any.
  • Clothing description. Type, color, coat, hat, shoes...
  • Method and direction of travel.

To describe a vehicle, try to provide:

  • License plate of vehicle (most important).
  • Year, make, and model of vehicle - at least the type of vehicle.
  • Color of vehicle.
  • Damage or outstanding features (one headlight, broken taillight, logos, special paint, special rims/tires, roof rack, antennae etc.)

June 23, 2015

Summer Meeting - Crime Watch Reboot

L Streets NA Summer Meeting - Crime Watch Reboot
Thursday, July 9, 7:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Highlands Christian Church, 9949 McCree Road
Guest Speaker, Crime Watch and VIP Guru, Darrell Wood


Darrell Wood's story is about how he helped change his neighborhood.

It's a fact. Crime happens in our L Streets Neighborhood. From July 2014 through last weekend there have been 46 incidents of crime that have impacted us in our L Streets Neighborhood homes. Two of those were robberies — violent crime — fortunately no one was seriously injured.

Crime is a "lowest common denominator" because it can happen to anyone. Crime has a negative pull. Crime makes us less safe. Crime costs us time. Crime costs us money. Crime can even act to lower real estate value and, as you know, real estate value in the L Streets Neighborhood is well worth protecting.

Come to learn how Crime Watch is not activity that requires a lot of time, it's really an attitude. A positive force.

May 16, 2015

Annual Block Party

Saturday, June 13th, from 5 pm to 10 pm.

We are keeping the activities from last year and adding a few more. At dusk we'll start a movie for the kids and BYO Biergarten for the adults.

More information to come!